St Georges Hall Beer Festival

Think locally at St Georges Hall beer festival 2015

a busy previous St Georges hall beer festival in grand surroundings!

St Georges hall beer festival 2015 is on this weekend! If you didn’t get any tickets commiserations. I myself am not going this time owing to festival fatigue. The beer list was released just a few days ago and includes many of the new breweries in the local area. Even though I can’t attend there are several I can strongly recommended you try ill list those below. Many of these are newer brewers and have only just started operating this year.

Ladies that Beer

Worth mentioning as well to any female visitors is are you a lady that likes beer? or are you curious about trying some at this festival? If you are Ladies that beer will be at the festival on Friday evening between 7-7.30pm! Ladies that beer are a welcoming group who want to encourage more women to drink good beer, and can offer you great advice on beer styles and brewing. They are very active on social media and host regular events for members. you can chat with them direct by clicking the links to Facebook and Twitter. Check your program for where they are located within the beer festival and go say hello!

Uh yeah but I just drink lager – an appeal

Some bottled continental lagers will no doubt be available but please don’t waste the opportunity at the festival to sample the ales available. The main thing is do not be afraid or embarrassed to ask what to try! That’s what the volunteers are for! If you traditionally prefer lagers try starting with something pale or lighter coloured and maybe move up to more amber coloured beers. If you like a strong hoppy lager try some IPA’s.

Volunteers will offer you a taster before you commit so don’t be afraid to try a few. Just don’t take the piss and ask to try 10! When you sample what is out there hopefully it will open up for you a whole world of different tastes to enjoy.

Recommended beers to try

So below I am going to suggest which beers by brewer to try while at the festival, some I have had in person others I think sound interesting, I will of course indicate which ones I have actually tried.

Neptune Brewery

Located in Maghull, Neptune just started producing full-time this year. They offer a great broad colour range of ales to choose from. Neptunes ales are becoming available on draught at pubs and bars around the region. And are also available bottled in many of the local beer shops to try at home Neptune also do not use Isinglass finings which is great news for those with specific dietary requirements!

  • Amberjack 4.5% – an easy drinking with nice bittering and a marmalade like finish.
  • Riptide  3.6% – English bitter, which is nicely balanced and very sessionable
  • Triton 4.4% – pale ale, good hop flavouring and nice light biscuity finish

Keep an eye out in the pubs and shops for the “thick and twisted” and abyss these are both very lovely dark beers. Also worth trying is AmberJack’d a stronger version of the already tasty 4.5%.

Red Star Brewery

Bridging the gap in the West Lancashire plain and based in Formby is Red Star another Merseyside micro-brewery. With a solid small core range they are quickly becoming regular features in many of the local pubs and bars, bottles again are also available in the many local beer shops too.

  • Partisan 5.4% – strong-tasting and complex malty brew with nice bittering, smooth.
  • Weissbier 5.3% – a new ale, unfiltered and unfined so naturally cloudy, wheaty body and fruity.
  • Formby IPA 4% – tweaked since my last tasting but had lovely toffee malts.

Keep an eye out locally on draught or in bottle for Hurricane a strong bitter which punches way above its weight, bit of trivia the partisan is quite popular amongst some eastern European football fans!

Rock the Boat

Another micro-brewer who has just commenced operation this year is Rock the boat, working out of a 16th century wheelwright’s workshop in Little Crosby Village. Currently working with a good core range at the moment there maybe a stout on the horizon soon!

  • Bootle Bull 3.8% – a great traditional bitter which leans more towards malts than hops, don’t miss.
  • Dazzle 3.6% – a well bittered pale with a nice initial bite to it.
  • Liverpool Light 3.4% – very sessionable and refreshing pale.

Also try the mussel wreck at the festival i have not tried this myself yet but is a 3.9% golden ale. Hopefully bottles will be available soon to take home!

Liverpool Craft Beer Co

Established in 2010 and operating from the railway arches on love lane, LCB have become a local favourite amongst drinkers, pubs and bars in the area. they have a core range supplemented by changing seasonal and one-off special brews. Please note I have not tried any of the beers below yet sadly, however knowing the good work the brewery puts in I can recommend them easily!

  • Hinnomaki Wheat 4.7% – Hefeweizen style ale, so naturally cloudy and fruity
  • Pzyk Diablo 4.8% – a tea infused ale brewed for liverpool festival of psychedelia
  • Springbok 4.6% – a pale ale which i believe has been brewed with south African hops

LCB bottles are readily available in many outlets across the region to take home. American Red is one of my favourite beers that LCB produce and keep an eye out for their oatmeal stout!

The Melwood Beer Company

Up and running since 2013 and based in the picturesque Knowsley parkland area. currently operating out of the old Cambrinus premises. A regular fixture in many of the pubs and bars in Liverpool and the surrounding areas, a regular range of beers with a tie to music are brewed along with one off brews.

  • High Time 4.2% – rarely brewed on cask a good sessionable pale.
  • Jester 4.4% – made with the new English jester hops (unsampled)
  • Life Of Riley 4.5% – balanced pale ale (unsampled)

Melwood beers are also available to take home bottled from stores in the area.

Liverpool Organic Brewery

Festival organisers LOB have a large range of beers to sample, some have been available in hand pump dispense in previous years so keep an eye out for these! Based close to the Leeds & Liverpool canal LOB is currently one of the longest-serving breweries in the city and brew a large range of beers.

  • Kitty Wilkinson Chocolate & Vanilla Stout 4.5% – a lovely stout with choc malts
  • Bier Head 4.1% – based on an old Higsons recipe.

Bottles of the entire range are very easy to find in local beer shops.

Peerless Brewing Company

Operating since 2009 Birkenhead based Peerless has recently expanded its capacity and is a popular fixture in pubs on the Wirral and on the Liverpool side of the Mersey. A core range of beers is regularly produced along with seasonal’s and one-off’s, they hold regular brewery tours and “thirsty Thursday” open nights.

  • Fusion 3.5% – session pale ale with a blend of UK hops
  • Peninsula IPA 5.7% – popular and robust smooth IPA with biscuity malts.
  • Waimea 3.7% – an amber New Zealand hopped ale (unsampled)

Peerless bottles are available in many shops around the area and are also available direct from the brewery as are some mini kegs for home use. I recommended trying the Red Rocks, Paxtons peculiar and the lovely oatmeal stout.

Brimstage Brewery

Based on a farm in the heart of the Wirral and founded in 2006, Brimstage have a solid core range of ales that are found regularly around the Wirral and Merseyside. Bottles are easily found in many of the shops in the local area.

  • Rhode Island Red 4.0% – a pleasant red ale that is malty and sweet
  • Scarecrow 4.2% – marmalade coloured fruity session ale
  • Trappers Hat 3.8% – smooth and easy drinking session ale.

Oyster catcher is also a nice stout to keep an eye out for

Cheshire Brew Brothers

Located just outside Ellsemere Port and opened within the last few years Cheshire brew bros have become a regular fixture in bars across the Wirral and Cheshire, and produce a regular range of core ales.

  • Cheshire Best Bitter 4.5% – English style bitter which is a bit more malt forward
  • Earls Eye Amber 3.8% – tasty amber tinged beer with a slight smokey after-taste
  • Roodee Dark 4.0% – lush dark ale with hints of coffee

Bottles are available to take home in many of the shops around the region.

In Closing

I hope that you do enjoy your time at the festival, enjoy the quality local beers from our local brewers, get some local food and have a great time. But don’t forget if you enjoyed what you had, SUPPORT your local brewers, drink their beer, follow them on social media, and interact with them. These people are not sat in an Ivory tower they are regular working people like you and I and it’s us buying their beer that keeps them in business and keeps the lovely beer flowing. Support your local brewers and support your local pubs! Because lets not forget Liverpool and its surrounding areas are chocker with great places to drink.

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St Georges Hall Beer Festival 2014

The second of two new beer festivals that were born last year the St Georges Hall Beer fest is set up in the eponymous 160 year old neoclassical building, a grand setting just like the Crypt Location for CAMRA’s beer festival, arguably one of the largest beer festivals in the city, last year over 5,500 people visited the inaugural festival, myself included. Numbers were expected to exceed that this year, it certainly felt like it did. read on to see how the second outing for the festival shaped up.

Organisation: papers please

As is quite the norm now for local beer festivals the tickets were available from many places, chiefly online via the eventbrite website, and ive never had an issue with it (unless your printer runs out of ink), it’s a good smooth process and it works! tickets were available on the door to some sessions.

And as usual for these events swapping your tickets and hard-earned pounds at the door will net you a festival glass, program and book of 8 tickets for £12, smaller denominations were available though. pricing was helpfully flat across all beers, other than bottles of continental lager for the unbeliever.

After navigating the corridors of st Georges hall the vast majority of this years action took place in the cavernous great hall, food was available in side rooms and the beers were readily accessible, in the previous year keg beer and entertainment had been relegated upstairs to the concert room. This year entertainment was in the great hall itself but more on that later.

The large open space made itself well suited to hosting a large number of casks on the stillages and long rows of shared tables and benches, though these filled up quickly on friday evening when we visited it wasnt to hard to find somewhere to sit down if you needed, you could also this time step out onto the top of the steps outside the hall facing the plateau if you fancied a breather.

Hats off again to whoever designs and writes the programs for the festival, they are usually packed with all the info you need and the really important information the beer tasting notes and colour are clear. new for this year were abbreviated notes such as adding IPA to denote an india pale ale, and ST for a stout, and so on. it might not be necessary to veteran drinkers but i think it’s a good idea to help out all the newbies. I myself used it when quickly scouting the program while mixing up my styles.

Munchables

Perennial beer festival favourites Peninsula Pies, Liverpool Cake Co and Liverpool Cheese Co were all present again to satisfy whichever tooth was itching for food. I myself grabbed the last sausage roll of the night! and still lovely it was too! last year the Blackburn hotel was present providing some warmer foods such as scouse, something i would have liked to see again, but the spread of food on was enough to satisfy most!

The Beer

284 real ales were available this year up on last years 260 odd, again keg beer has made a welcome addition to the setup, cider is as usual available and so is Liverpool Gin.

Now im going to get right to the point the beer this year was just not good, the quality was quite poor, i am not the only person to comment on this several friends have agreed with this assessment and also some total strangers at the festival and on social media. Liverpool Organic have themselves admitted it was not that good, it seems whatever options were used for cooling did not work out all that well this year. I can’t remember too clearly what last years beers were like so it’s not fair to compare them to a previous session. However when compared to the Waterloo beer festival and Liverpool Craft Beer expo there was something definitely amiss, beers just didn’t taste as vibrant or were straight up warm. something we all know real ale shouldnt be. It’s good that Liverpool Organic have commented on the quality i hope it can improve for next year but i fear the actual problem is St Georges hall itself. Its huge, and when the light comes streaming in through the windows straight onto the casks it cannot be doing them any good.

Were there any stand out beers on this year then? well because of the overall disappointing quality its hard to decide. A week previous I tasted Wapping breweries Amarillo Pale ale at the Baltic Fleet Pub, home of the brewery, it was a lovely pale with a  intriguing woody resinous smell and taste. Angus the chief brewer of Wapping suggested trying it at the festival to see how its quality held up moving from source to stillage. I can honestly say it was affected, while it was definitely a nice pale that unique smell and taste had gone. So i had a feeling from that point on things might be affected by the environment the ales were in. Probably Bristol Beer Factories Sorachi was the best ale to me, it was recommended to me by a friend who was volunteering and it didn’t disappoint, im finding something of a taste for sorachi myself.

Flicking back through the program i can see a decent spread of ale colours, some beer festivals are guilty of having barely anything above an amber colour on offer so it was good to see a nice range of milds, stouts and porters on offer.

One thing that i noticed was missing before i even got to the festival was the unusual absence of Liverpool Craft Beer Ales. It’s rare to not see them at a local festival, I don’t know why they were absent, i was told there was nothing untoward about them being left out of it, but it is the first time it’s ever happened. Hopefully its just a blip, its good to see local brewers working together and complementing one another.

Music for the Masses

Last year the entertainment was situated up in the concert room, which would make sense given the title of the room but a curious one considering few people would probably wander up there, i felt a bit sorry for the groups and artists up there. This year entertainment was moved down in to the great hall and oh dear it didn’t really do it much justice. I think once again the problem here is St Georges hall itself. When the entertainment started we were sat right at the back by the organ and try as they might the band just couldn’t be heard at the back over the chattering masses and echoey acoustics of the hall. The only real option was to move closer to the band if you wanted to hear them. penniless Tenants were in session on every night excluding sunday, im not a big fan of irish folk music but they were enjoyable to listen to and certainly folks didnt want them to pack up at the end of the night.  Other entertainers included Uke Box, South London Jazz orchestra and Pete Brown spoke at the festival on Friday day session.

Volunteer Army

Despite the disappointing quality of the beer and the entertainment struggling against the halls acoustics one thing you cannot fault is the reliable unsung heroes who turn up to these events ready to help out, serve you a beer and offer advice and banter on whats on. There were many familiar faces from other beer festivals in the region. without these people it simply wouldn’t happen so we should always be grateful for their attendance!

Feedback and other issues

If your still reading then I thought id make a little extra section for more constructive feedback rather than just summarise what happened. As I said you can’t fault the organisation of the event or the staff and volunteers but the beer quality took a real knock this year, so too did the entertainment in my opinion.

I cant help but wonder then  is St Georges hall really suitable? it certainly packs people in if that what your after but does it lend itself to the storage of beer? cooling seems to have been an issue and what with the warm sunny september we have had it doesn’t seem to have done the ale on the stillage any favours, anyone who has visited St Georges hall before knows it’s a wonderful open grand hall but sunlight certainly streams in, and sunlight is one of the big enemies of beer.

Most beer lovers know that Cask beer doesn’t usually keep for more than 3 days or so once its been tapped. So why is there a trade session on Wednesday when the main bulk of the festival takes place over 4 days? why not do away with the trade session all together so it gives the Ale less chance to start deteriorating? or even maybe limit it to a Friday Saturday and Sunday? or Thursday to Saturday? I Previously had mixed feelings about the rotation method at Liverpool Craft Beer Expo but wonder if this sort of thing would suit a larger beer festival?

One other thing that really irked me and a few others is the inclusion of a VIP section. This is the only beer festival i have ever been to that has had one and i think it is a very bad idea. The enjoyment of quality beer should bring people together, it should be inclusive, not exclusive, coming to a beer festival all suited and booted and hiding away in a room with other people goes against the principle of a beer festival and for me that’s to enjoy good beer, food and music at a big social occasion. I would like to see the removal of the VIP section from future festivals, they have no place at them as far as im concerned, while we are on the subject of VIP’s i cant help but think that there is a creeping amount of corporatism (is that even a word) creeping in? Sponsorship may be important to some of these events but did anyone at the festival even pay attention to the sponsors? I didn’t. Maybe therefore my argument above is moot? I just worry that VIP areas and Corporate sponsoring is a slippery slope.

The last thing that i think was a bit of a let down was some of the people at the festival, its great to welcome new people to the festivals, but when they are holiday drunks who only drink a few times a year and spend the entire night drinking a bottle of lager i have to wonder why they came? I saw people barging into one another in the corridors and people arguing about seating and proceeding to take seats even when they were for people who were already there, indeed this happened to me. I’ve never seen one bit of a trouble at a beer festival and the atmosphere was still better than any saturday night in concert square but there just seemed to be something missing at this years St Georges festival.

Maybe we could have beer festival mentors? “have you been to a beer festival before? no? ok would you like me to tell you how to get the most from it?” something like that maybe! Personally id stop the sale of bottled continental lagers and wine, its a beer festival for crying out loud. maybe that’s a tad too draconian?

I’m not sure what a good fix would be for the entertainment, moving it back upstairs is an option but again it puts it out-of-the-way for most people, maybe the PA system needs a helping hand? get a few more speakers in about the place, the issue with that is then just like in a noisy pub everyone is fighting to be heard. It’s a difficult one that I don’t have a real suggestion for.

Ill end now by at least saying remember it is only the second year that such a festival has been put on in St Georges hall, not everything will go right first two times, and from it the organisers will no doubt learn lessons that will hopefully improve upon it for next years festival, you wont have to wait to long as a winter ales festival is set to be run in January, being a fan of winter ales im strongly considering getting myself a ticket! Its no easy task organising a beer festival, so lets see how things get on next year for St Georges beer festival?!